False Recognition in Women Reporting Recovered Memories of Sexual Abuse

TitleFalse Recognition in Women Reporting Recovered Memories of Sexual Abuse
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2000
AuthorsClancy, SA, Schacter, DL, McNally, RJ, Pitman, RK
JournalPsychological Science
Volume11
Pagination26-31
Abstract

False recognition—the mistaken belief that one has previously encountered a novel item—was examined in four groups of subjects: women reporting recovered memories of childhood sexual abuse, women who believe that they were sexually abused as children but who cannot recall this abuse (the “repressed” group), women who were sexually abused as children and always remembered the abuse, and women with no history of childhood sexual abuse. Subjects were administered a Deese/Roediger-McDermott paradigm. The results suggest that the recovered-memory group was more prone to false recognition than the other groups. In addition, women reporting recovered and repressed memories showed greater reduction in false recognition across study trials than did other subjects, perhaps reflecting strategic changes in performance.

DOI10.1111/1467-9280.00210